struggling readers

The Magic of Decodable Texts
| |

The Magic of Decodable Texts

  Decodable Texts are a Powerful Tool What’s the big deal about decodable texts?   Approximately 20% of the population is prone to a language based learning disability.  For these learners, reading does not come ‘naturally’.  To meet with reading success, repeated opportunities to practice code are non-negotiable.  Systematic, sequential, and cumulative practice with the alphabetic…

| |

Why Develop Phonemic Awareness in Emergent Readers?

Phonemic Awareness: A Prerequisite for Reading Success What is phonemic awareness? Phonemic Awareness is an oral language skill that includes a number of discrete skills: rhyming isolating beginning, middle, and ending sounds segmenting and blending phonemes manipulating phonemes Click here for more details on phonemic awareness. Why is phonemic awareness important? Phonemic Awareness is a…

|

Back to School: Getting to Know Your Second and Third Grade Readers

Essential Decoding Assessments for Primary Readers Second and third grade is where the ‘rubber hits the road,’ so to speak. While much of kindergarten and first grade reading instruction focuses on learning to read through phonological awareness skills and applying the alphabetic principle, second and third grade begins the transition from ‘learning to read’ toward ‘reading to learn.’

|

3 Summer Must Reads: Book Recommendations for Teachers of Reading

It’s not too late to squeeze in a few more professional reads this summer! As mentioned in a previous book review post, teaching reading is an art-form. It is also a science. Here we discuss three more titles; each one addressing a different aspect of teaching reading: the art, the science, and the practical application.

| |

Supporting Emergent Readers Through Successive Blending  

Helping Students Make the Sound-to-Print Connection What is successive blending? Successive Blending is an instructional technique that provides a scaffold for students who are unable to sequence more than two sounds. For example, a student who would benefit from successive blending might read the word “tag” as “tap”, “ag”, or “got”, among other possibilities.  This…