Phonics

What is a Closed Syllable and Why is it Important?
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What is a Closed Syllable and Why is it Important?

Teaching beginning readers about the closed syllable is an important first step in reading success. Kindergarten, First Grade, and emergent readers benefit from lessons that include explicit, systematic instruction of the syllable type, both in isolation and in connected text (decodable readers). 

Why You Should be Teaching Phonics: Common Phonics Myths Debunked!

 Phonics is NOT a Dirty Word Scientific, brain-based research supports explicit, sequential, and cumulative phonics instruction in the early grades.  According to Louisa Moats, “[Phonics instruction] is so accepted in the scientific world that if you just write another paper about these fundamental facts and submit it to a journal they won’t accept it because it’s…

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Supporting Emergent Readers Through Successive Blending  

Helping Students Make the Sound-to-Print Connection What is successive blending? Successive Blending is an instructional technique that provides a scaffold for students who are unable to sequence more than two sounds. For example, a student who would benefit from this technique might read the word “tag” as “tap”, “ag”, or “got”, among other possibilities.  This…

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Making a Case for Word Study Instruction

Systematic, Sequential, Cumulative, Explicit Every year, we inevitably encounter students with a similar reading profile. These are the students who score within the independent range for comprehension. However, oral reading fluency scores tend to indicate a need for support. Closer examination of fluency will likely reveal decreased accuracy with minimal self-corrections. Rate, however, may falsely…